Managing Licenses on the Edge – Flexera’s New product

The exploding growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) has brought massive change to license and security management. Even the smallest sensor has one or more software drivers, and there is growing recognition that the true value in the device or product lies in its use and the execution of the embedded software, rather than the device itself. New revenue models based on consumption rather than sale of capital-intensive assets are being adopted by industrial device and product manufacturers. Manufacturers of CT scanners recognise that small-scale hospitals and clinics cannot afford the capex for their hardware, so an alternative where the scanner is leased and the hospital is charged when scans are done is becoming popular. This has created a move to licenses embedded in the devices side-by-side with the software that drives the device. There are billions of “things” that are already connected via the Internet, and the volumes are increasing exponentially. This has created a new challenge, managing the data.

The Data Avalanche and How to Contain it

All the machines participating in the IoT have one purpose, to feed back data to a central source. This is creating huge volumes of data which are measured in petabytes and zettabytes. In principle, this data is streamed back via the cloud to data centers located in remote sites across the globe. In reality this model does not work:-

  • not all data gathered by a sensor is required real-time
  • Distance is not dead; the time taken to transmit a message to a data center and receive a reply may not meet requirements, especially because it is the cloud provider that directs the message, not the owner or vendor of the sensor
  • Some data is very time-critical, and needs low latency to get a response to the message, for instance, a pacemaker sensing a pending cardiac arrest needs an immediate reaction
  • Many devices are kept offline, due to security or connectivity constraints
  • Each connected device is a cyber risk which could allow hackers to infiltrate the main ecosystem

The answer to mitigate these risks is edge computing and edge computers.

What is Edge Computing and will it Destroy the Cloud?

Edge (or fog) computing takes processing close to the device (Fog computing is a descriptive synonym for edge computing, coined by Cisco, and while there are differences in how fog and edge network, the principles are basically the same, so we use edge here to cover both edge and fog).

Edge is both a halfway house to the cloud and a pre-processor that can return a response to the device in time-critical situations. There are those that believe that edge computers will displace cloud computing, while others believe that the two will always co-exist. Typical edge hardware is designed for high availability and very powerful, with GPUs to process data rapidly. Obviously, to perform as required, it needs its own software for various activities, including:-

  • polling sensors to send data,
  • evaluating and consolidating the data (rather like the ETL of a data warehouse)
  • application processing for time-critical responses (e.g. avoiding an accident for an autonomous vehicle)
  • and even AI and machine learning to provide business intelligence and to improve its own performance.

Where there is software, there must be a license, which must be managed, and Flexera have identified the need and devised a solution.

Flexera Edge – Managing Connected and Unconnected Devices

The development of a product to manage licenses on the edge makes good sense, when you consider this statement made by Gartner in 2017.

Currently, around 10% of enterprise-generated data is created and processed outside a traditional centralized data center or cloud. By 2022, Gartner predicts this figure will reach 50 percent.

They recently revised this statement (October 2018).

Currently, around 10% of enterprise-generated data is created and processed outside a traditional centralized data center or cloud. By 2022, Gartner predicts this figure will reach 75 percent.

IDC, in their predictions for IoT for 2018 stated

Prediction 7: By 2020, IT Spend on Edge Infrastructure Will Reach up to 18% of the Total Spend on IoT Infrastructure, Driven by Deployments of Converged IT/OT Systems That Reduce the Time to Value of Data Collected from Their Connected Devices

This, coupled with the concerns about Cyberthreats mentioned in the same report, makes it extermely good sense to be focusing on edge computing as the place where asset, entitlement and license management should be happening:-

Prediction 1: By 2020, the Potential Cybersecurity and Physical Safety Concerns Associated with IoT Devices Will Pressure CIOs at G2000 Companies to Increase IoT Security Spending by up to 25%, Temporarily Neutralizing Business Productivity Gains

Flexera have heeded the call and developed a product for managing devices at the edge.

The reasoning behind the product is simple:-

  • There already are billions of devices out there that need software enhancements and fixes updated. Some of these updates may be very occasional, but other devices may require updates daily or even more frequently.
  • The zettabytes of data reaching the edge should be aggregated and analysed and the distilled result should be relayed up to the cloud. This implies that edge computers will carry their own portfolio of software that enables them to perform AI and self-learn.
  • The customization of devices by applying rules in embedded software within the device as to what features the organization or even a single user signed up for, means that universal updates are no longer viable.
  • Entitlement management has to be applied in conjunction with the software update
  • Managing this from the cloud is impractical and unwieldy, because there are so many devices to which updates must be streamed.
  • Managing this manually is completely impossible.
  • Keeping software current is just not good enough; for some industries, it has to be proven that the latest release is the one being used. This is a requirement from the FDA, but may well be taken up by other authorities.
  • All the above applies to disconnected devices too.

An edge computer is the best platform for managing and controlling the software assets of devices that network to it. It can manage the updates for both connected and disconnected devices, without opening them up to cyberrisk, report on the current state of its IoT community, what software versions are out there, who is actually using them and which features and alert to any aberrations.

This means that the edge computer itself must be extremely secure and resistant to threats and attacks. From a physical perspective, and because many edge devices are situated in industrial locations, the computers themselves are ruggedized and housed in protective cages and lockers. Logically, there must be a resilient and resistant security infrastructure that will ward off cyber attacks within the edge computer logic. If the edge computer is secure, the devices it manages have a reduced risk of attack. If there is a direct attack on a device, the edge computer should be able to quarantine it and prevent the virus or infection from spreading.

Changing the Licensing Landscape

The traditional licensing landscape is still adapting to the changes imposed by factors such as cloud computing, BYOD and embedded software. The traditional setup of the on-site license server that controls perpetual and named licenses is inappropriate for the IoT, and will have to make way for new models that permit edge computers to oversee license and entitlement. While the emphasis is on monetizing the software that drive the IoT devices, the administration of who owns the licenses, what their entitlements are  and what software version they are using still need to be managed. A consolidated view of the feedback of all the edge computers for the organization is also a necessity. There will be many new licensing and asset management products reaching the market in the next few years as the demand for applications that can manage IoT licensing and entitlement grows, joining Flexera in this new niche.

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Altair’s New Licensing for solidThinking is a Win for SMEs

A major barrier to innovation for startups and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) is the cost of simulation software. Combining this cost with the learning curve required to apply the principles embedded in computer-aided engineering (CAE) has resulted in many great ideas not getting to market. It is widely recognised that SMEs are the powerhouse of economic growth globally, and that every effort should be made to facilitate their rocky path to create a sustainable business. Altair’s contribution to SME growth is to make CAE more accessible, firstly by changing their licensing model for solidThinking.

Eight years ago, when they released Hyperworks 11.0, Altair changed their license manager from Flexera to LM-X from X-Formation. The objective of this change was to provide greater flexibility in the licensing options offered to customers, especially for their Hyperworks suite. The licensing model is units-based and the customer buys and uses the Hyperworks units (HWUs) according to the business need, selecting the specific software they require from the suite, rather than buying licenses for each product. Users of solidThinking software were still required to buy each of the products they wanted, based on the license model that was in force when Altair acquired solidThinking.

Although Altair had purchased solidThinking in 2008, they did not change the license management software from the original Flexera FlexLM and the purchase-per-product approach until recently, in August 2018. solidThinking units (sTUs) are now available for all products in the solidThinking suite. The units are stored in a pool, and the user books out the software he needs by checking out the number of units required for that application, for instance, Altair Inspire 2018. On finishing with the application, the sTUs are returned to the pool for the next user.

A Single Licensing Model for On-Site and the Cloud

To simplify the license model even more, the software can either be used on-site or in the cloud. This is useful for SMEs who have limited computing power and want to avail themselves of cloud services, such as Altair’s own cloud-hosting service, Altair 365. The number of units required for the organization is also flexible; units can be added or removed to fit current circumstances.

Existing customers can convert to the new model with the minimum of fuss:-

  • Perpetual license holders with maintenance agreements will have their licenses converted to full sTU licenses for the same cost as the existing annual maintenance agreement.
  • Where the perpetual license holder had let their maintenance agreement lapse, there was an offer made  to upgrade the existing licenses during an incentive period, which lapsed at the end of December 2018.
  • Where the licenses were being leased, the customer is upgraded to sTU licensing at no additional cost.

For all existing license holders, the conversion gives them access to the entire solidThinking suite of applications, and the ability to run the programs on-site or in the cloud.

More Intuitive Software

Altair recognizes that many SMEs will not have the necessary skills on-board to handle the complexities of CAE. To this end, they have focused on making the simulation products easy to use and intuitive, both for engineers who are familiar with simulation software and other resources who are not from a engineering background but need to run simulations. The combination of easy-to-use software and an affordable pricing model make solidThinking an attractive option for SMEs. Through purchasing sTUs, they have access to 9 applications, ranging from conceptual designs using Evolve through to extrusion and cast metal moulding using the Inspire applications for this. There is even Compose, a programming language for mathematical modelling, similar to Matlab.

The flexibility of the solution, combined with its scaleability, allows an SME to develop and grow at their own pace. Cost constraints imposed by the need to invest in costly high-performance computing can be avoided by using the cloud, either Altair’s own service or another cloud provider. By removing the barriers to using simulation software, Altair has levelled the playing field for small businesses to compete against large organizations. Using simulation software instead of prototyping both reduces costs of product development and accelerates time to market.

Small Startups get a Boost

While Altair has come up with this licensing model to boost innovation by small businesses, it recognises that the cost may still be beyond the means of early-stage startups. For this reason they have developed a startup program for startups and entrepreneurs who meet certain criteria, including:-

  • an annual revenue of less than $10 million
  • a privately held concern, and
  • less than 4 years old.

Apart from providing software at deep discounts of up to 80%, Altair also offers free consultancy and training to such startups. They are also prepared to assist SMEs who do not meet the criteria with discounts, based on the current state of their business.

Like other vendors providing simulation software, Altair facilitates academic institutions by providing discounted software to the institutions and teachers, and free software to students who need to perform simulations as part of their studies.

How Altair benefits from the New License Model

While the units-based license model brings in less revenue from a user who previously had to buy each of the solidThinking applications separately, Altair have opened up their market to a new customer base of SMEs and startups. This means more sales and the ability to partner with small businesses as they grow. Their larger customers, such as Airbus and Samsung, can also benefit from the new business model, which is easy to administer and tailor according to demand.

Customers who start the relationship with solidThinking products can move on to other Altair products as the need arises, such as their high-performance platform or Internet of Things and digital twins platforms. In this respect, the new license model is a win-win for both Altair and their customers.

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Taking the Pain out of Flexlm License Allocation

One of the key administrative tasks when it comes to software license management is controlling the allocation of licenses for each user. This is especially complex when it comes to engineering and scientific software, where that user may require 30 or 40 specialized and costly applications to perform his job to the standard required. We have had an increase in requests from customers of Flexera FlexNet Manager (and a few other license manager tools) for a product that makes license allocation easier for them. The main problem is that the file where allocations are set up, which is the “options” file in FlexNet, does not link to the company’s organizational directory, such as Microsoft’s Active Directory.

OpenLM’s license manager software does link to the organization’s directory as a matter of course. This means that any change to the organizational directory is synchronised through to the allocations table in OpenLM. This cuts down a load of manual work managing two separate allocation views and also reduces the possibility of error. The users of Flexera license management products are aware of OpenLM’s capability in this area, but have invested much time and money in getting FlexNet tailored for their organization, so are reluctant to change vendors at this stage, but are looking for something to ease the “Options” file pain. We are glad to announce that we now have a solution.

OpenLM License Allocation Manager

The OpenLM License Allocation Manager (or LAM) is a software product dedicated to the management of license allocation. This new release is limited to allocation for Flexera licenses, but imminent releases will cater for other license management software. It can be bought as a stand-alone product that does not impact any existing license management software installation. The software integrates with the organizational directory and the license administrator no longer has to cope with updating the text file for license allocation used by FlexNet.

While many of our customers are happy just to have this directory link enabled, there is much, much more that gives precise control over license control. Parameters are included to allow customization of allocation for:-

  • Allocation and access by user group, for example a specific project team.
  • Geolocation, where access is managed based on the user’s location.
  • Time of use. This parameter helps in managing peak demand and can be combined with location and/or group.
  • Software version. Where multiple instances of a software package are used, a user or user group may be permitted to or prohibited from using a specific version.
  • Workbench management. Where a portmanteau license has been acquired, such as AutoDesk’s bundled offerings, the user can be limited to using only some of the products.
  • Feature limitation. Especially with token licensing, specific features may carry an extra cost or be in scarce supply. Allocation can be tailored to permit or limit access to a feature within an application.

License Allocation Manager OpenLM

We have not exhausted the possibilities that our new LAM software offers. If you believe that this product could help you solve your current license allocation problems, why don’t you contact OpenLM to find out more and try the software for your own environment?

Time of day: Some licenses entitle users a “follow the sun” policy, granting licenses on different time zones according to the time of day. Server availability: Some license management systems provide a multiple server redundancy scheme to ensure license availability in case of hardware or network failure. Changes in infrastructure: Migrating a license manager from one server to another may require changes in configuration of end user workstations Dynamic users: Users join and leave the organization, and migrate among groups and projects. User prioritization: Ranking of users in the hierarchy of license priority and application license level may change over time. Project priorities shift: The allocation plan should reflect the priorities dictated for each project. These priorities are also dynamic by nature.

For more information about OpenLM products and their capabilities, please visit our website.

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Finding a pot of gold in your software license portfolio

A substantial part of the budget of any company is taken up by IT, especially in engineering, healthcare and scientific organizations. For this reason, most CFOs scrutinize any capex or opex emanating from the IT division. One of the recurring costs that is laid out there in black and white will be for software licensing. The CFO will be unhappy about this ever-increasing cost, but regards it as an important part of compliance; after all, he does not want to be subject to a software audit that finds the company has compromised their license agreement and are now subject to a punitive fine. The number of licenses purchased and how efficiently they are used is rightly regarded as the CIO’s responsibility.

The CIO’s Challenge

The CIO, in turn, does his best to optimize license usage, by buying concurrent user licenses where possible and then monitoring that these licenses are used as efficiently as possible. However, if he is relying on the license management software provided by the vendor, the visibility of what is really happening is limited; the software is provided to help the vendor monitor usage, rather than the customer. Some organizations  that have never paid much attention to engineering and scientific software licensing costs, especially where licenses are acquired for every project and those costs are passed on to the customer. In these organizations, the licenses are often not under the control of IT, but are looked after by the relevant engineering department or project.

This does not mean that there are not IT shops who actively monitor and report on their concurrent licenses, but good license management results in demonstrable cost savings, and the CIO will obviously not downplay his success in cost reduction. There will also be readily available reports, which the CFO should take the time to understand.

Are The Cost of Engineering Licenses Often Overlooked?

The CFO is aware of licensing costs. After all the company usually has ERP, accounting and human capital software with which he is closely involved, as well as general office software, such as Microsoft Office, and will probably have several cloud-based applications like SalesForce. For these software products he has a close involvement in the licensing and renewals, but they tend to be on a per-seat or per user basis. This might be why so many CFOs leave money on the table when it comes to engineering software. The CFO will question the acquisition of new hardware, such as a high-spec laptop for the engineering department, but accept that new licenses need to be loaded on to the laptop. The fact that these licenses can cost far more than the laptop is often missed.

What a CFO can do to Mitigate these Costs

Tracking licensing costs for scientific and engineering software is a very labor-intensive task, especially if done manually. A diplomatic first step to get the information required, would be to request a new set of reports that show the number of licenses purchased, in use and the level of their utilization. There will probably be some resistance from the CIO, mainly because these values are very difficult if not impossible to determine using the vendor-supplied software. Any arguments can be countered by conceding that a reasonable budget will be allocated for getting the right software to do the job, but that this must be done as soon as possible. By showing empathy and understanding of the problem, there is no implication that the CIO has neglected to look after his licenses. It might even be the case that he has no control over these licenses, because the engineers buy and manage them directly.

Where this is the case, there may need to be some additional work to bring the license back under IT’s management. Whatever the situation, the reporting will be an eye-opener.

Finding the Money

There are three main sources of unnecessary spending or “waste” on licenses:-

  • unused licenses, or “shelfware”.
  • single-user or named user licenses that are only used occasionally
  • a concurrent or network license pool with poor utilization.

Shelfware. Unused licenses are commonly found where a set of new licenses was procured for a new project, and the project is now completed or the phase of the project where they were needed has passed. What tends to happen with these licenses is that license renewals are entered into without checking that they are needed. These licenses can immediately be dispensed with, you have enough licenses without them.

Single-User Licenses. It is often valid to purchase a single-user license for a resource who uses the software daily and for most of the day. However, there needs to be real justification for retaining them, rather than assigning the user to the concurrent user pool and freeing up the license, to be exchanged for a concurrent license or terminated. Single-user licenses are cheaper, but not if they are not used extensively.

Concurrent Licenses. Concurrent licenses cost more but can be used much more efficiently because users draw them from a pool and (hopefully) return them to the pool when they are finished (good license management software can manage that too by “harvesting” idle licenses). Ensuring that concurrent licenses are used to the maximum is not an overnight job, but the CIO should be able to demonstrate gradual improvement month-by-month once he has the right software to see what is really going on. We have several case studies where customers have used OpenLM to optimize concurrent license usage.

This may seem like an exercise that will result in small savings, but if you take the cost of these licenses into account, some companies have realized over a $1,000,000 by reducing their license overhead. It depends which software you use, but when you consider the price of Catia, Solidworks, Revit or AutoCad, it would be foolish not to get rid of licenses you don’t really need.

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FlexLM Security Vulnerability

According to the CERT system security organization, a buffer overflow vulnerability issue has been identified and reported for the Flexnet Publisher lmgrd license server daemon version 11.12.1.2 and earlier. This vulnerability could enable attackers to interface license servers, run malicious code, and compromise highly sensitive organizational software assets.

The recommended solutions for this issue are as follows:

  • Software vendors that distribute vulnerable lmgrd or vendor daemon components should obtain FlexNet Publisher 2015 (11.13.1.2) Security Update 1 or later from Flexera Software’s Product and License Center.
  • Users of Flexnet Publisher of relevant versions should contact their software vendors for assistance.

CERT is a highly acknowledged organization dedicated to the enhancement of computer systems security.

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OpenLM Maintenance Release Version: OpenLM Server 2.0.0.20

OpenLM Server version 2.0.0.20

OpenLM Server version 2.0.0.20 is an official maintenance release to OpenLM version 2.0. It contains some bug fixes to problems found in previous versions and enhancements. We recommend that all users of previous OpenLM Server 2.0 versions would upgrade to this latest version.

What’s new in OpenLM Server 2.0.0.20 (August 3rd, 2014)
Fixed Issues:

2136: [OpenLM Alerts] Alert – Feature usage percentage – Can not save when only one feature is selected
2137: [OpenLM Alerts] Alert – Feature usage percentage – “Delete All” not fully shown
2146: [OpenLM Server] OpenLM Server stops when trying to send a notification
2140: [EasyAdmin] Alerts – Email isn’t sent if user was selected in alert destination
2133: [EasyAdmin] Mail envelope icon not responsive
2132: [OpenLM Server] Option file not saving
2131: [EasyAdmin] License Feature Usage window is stuck minimized on closing
2129: [OpenLM Server] 1-jan-00 is parsed as 01.01.2000, instead of ‘permanent’

Prerequisites
1. Before upgrading please make sure your system is compliant with the OpenLM System requirements.
2. If the OpenLM server (of any version) has been already installed on the machine for a period longer than the Evaluation period, A license file will be required . Please make sure you have one before proceeding with the upgrade process.
In order to obtain a valid OpenLM license file, please contact OpenLM support, and provide your MAC address and Hostname (case sensitive).

Upgrading the OpenLM Server (Enbedded Firebird Database)
In order to upgrade to version 2.0.0.20:

1. Download the OpenLM Server installation file from the ‘Downloads’ section in the OpenLM site.
2. Stop the OpenLM Server service
3. Backup your DB file (Typically located in: C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLM\OpenLM Server\db)
4. Make sure ALL windows are closed; especially the services window.
5. Install the new version on top of the existing one.
6. If prompted to do so, contact OpenLM to obtain an up-to-date license file. Please provide your MAC address and Hostname (case sensitive) for that. Copy this file to the
C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLM\OpenLM Server\License   folder, and restart the OpenLM Server service.

Upgrading the OpenLM Server (External MS-SQL Database

In order to upgrade to version 2.0.0.20, please contact OpenLM support at support@openlm.com

 

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FLEXlm Timeout Settings

What is FLEXlm?

FLEXlm is a license manager that manages software used by multiple end users on different computers. Notably, it allows companies to take advantage of floating licenses. A system employing floating licenses has a license pool on a host server from which end users check out licenses. When a user finishes using a software license, it is checked back into the pool, now available for another user to check out.

Further information on FLEXlm

What is FLEXlm license timeout?

FLEXlm license timeout is a feature that releases inactive licenses back to the license pool. Licensed software is determined to be inactive when a machine is completely idle, meaning no mouse clicks, keystrokes, modal dialog boxes are occurring. Its timeout settings determines how long such a period continues before licenses are freed up.

How to set FLEXlm timeout

License timeout settings can be configured for some or all the features, and are configured in the FLEXlm option file.

Further information on option files

Individual license key timeout is set by entering the variable “timeout” followed by the timeout period (in seconds).

Example: Setting AutoCAD to be timed out in 108000 seconds (3 hours)

 timeout AutoCAD 108000

License timeout for all license keys in the system is set by the variable “timeoutall,” followed by the timeout period.

Example: Setting all licenses to be timed out after 30 minutes of inactivity

timeoutall 1800

Limitations on license timeout settings

It is important to note that software vendors often impose limitations on the timeout period for their products; specifically, the minimum amount of time of inactivity after which licenses can be freed up. For example, whereas Autodesk licenses can be released after 15 minutes of inactivity, MathWorks licenses can only be released after 4 hours.

Autodesk 900 sec (15 minutes)

MathWorks 14,400 seconds (4 hours)

IBM 7200 seconds (2 hours)

Application

Customizing FLEXlm timeout settings is simple way to improve the efficiency of your company’s licenses, ensuring that end users aren’t slowed down by waiting for inactive, locked-up licenses.

 

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FLEXnet Option Files Examples

What is FLEXnet publisher?

FLEXnet publisher (formerly known as FLEXlm) is a software license manager utilized by companies to manage software shared by different people on different workstations. With what are termed “floating licenses,” FLEXnet enables end users to draw and return software licenses from a license pool on a host server.

What is a FLEXnet option file?

An option file defines various operating parameters of the license manager.

Creating/Editing an option file

In order to create an option file, save a text document in the same folder as the license file. Next, the document the according to the name of the vendor, followed by the extension “.opt”

For example, an option file for Matlab will be named “mlm.opt”. Accordingly, option files for Autodesk and ESRI ArcGIS would be named “adskflex.opt” and “ARCGIS.opt,” respectively.

Allocating licenses to a specific user group

First, define a group with the keyword “GROUP,” followed by the name of the group, followed by the members of that group. Names are all case sensitive.

Example: A group called “Matlab_Users,” consisting of Billy, Jim, and Kim

GROUP Matlab_Users billy jim kim

Next, to select which licenses to allocate to that group, type the keyword “INCLUDE,” followed by the feature name, followed by the group name.

 Example: Allocating feature “Optimization Toolbox” to the group “Matlab_Users”

 INCLUDE MATLAB GROUP Matlab_Users

These two steps are combined:

GROUP Matlab_Users billy jim kim

INCLUDE MATLAB GROUP Matlab_Users

Limiting individuals or groups of users to a maximum number of licenses

In order to limit the usage of a feature by a group, first allocate the license to that group or individual as demonstrated above. Then, set a usage limit with the keyword “MAX,” followed by the name of the feature, followed by the group name.

Example: Limiting the max number of Autocad 2002 licenses used by group “Autocad_Users,” consisting of users Ronald and Lisa, to 7. (41100ACD_2002_OF is the name of the Autocad 2002 feature)

GROUP Autocad_Users ronald lisa

INCLUDE 41100ACD_2002_0F GROUP Autocad_Users

MAX 7 41100ACD_2002_0F GROUP Autocad_Users

Excluding access to specific features

Enter the keyword “EXCLUDE,” followed by the feature name, followed by group or individual being excluding.

Example: Excluding user Franklin from feature “Geosteering plug-in for Petrel 2013”

EXCLUDE OCEAN_SLB_SIM_GEOSTEERING franklin

Controlling license borrowing

To allow someone to borrow a feature, use keyword “BORROW,” followed by the name of the borrowed feature, followed by the user or group of users.

Example: Including users Bill and Sam in the list to borrow the feature Ansys Fluent

BORROW fluent bill sam

Alternately, to exclude someone from borrowing a feature, simply replace “BORROW” with “EXCLUDE_BORROW”

Example: Excluding users Bill and Sam from the list to borrow the feature Ansys Fluent

EXCLUDE_BORROW fluent bill sam

A “borrow lowwater” determines the number of licenses that must remain unused at any given time. Enter the keyword “BORROW_LOWWATER,” followed by the feature name, followed by the number of licenses that can’t be borrowed.

 Example: Setting a borrow lowwater for the feature autocad at 5

BORROW_LOWWATER autocad 5

To adjust how long a license feature can be borrowed, enter “MAX_BORROW_HOURS,” followed by the feature name, followed by the number of hours

Example: Maxing the number of hours a solidworks feature license can be borrowed for at 15 hours

MAX_BORROW_HOURS sldworks 15

Setting license timeout

FLEXlm license timeout is a feature that releases inactive licenses back to the license pool. Enter the keyword “TIMEOUT,” followed by name of the feature, followed by the time (in seconds) after which inactive licenses are released. To set a timeout for all features, simply enter “TIMEOUTALL,” followed by the time.

Example: Setting timeout for Matlab Database Toolbox for 14400 seconds (4 hours)

TIMEOUT Database_Toolbox 14400

Example: Setting a timeout for all licenses for 108000 (3 hours)

TIMEOUT  108000

The OpenLM Difference

OpenLM allows users to harness the full capability of option files using a unique graphical user interface. This interface dramatically simplifies the process of managing license parameters by allowing companies to use active directory groups to automatically generate option files.

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FLEXlm FLEXnet 2013 feature codes for Autodesk products

Feature Code => Product Name translation table can be found in Autodesk site: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/dl/item?siteID=123112&id=18708301&linkID=9240617

OpenLM updates this information regularly. If update is needed open the OpenLM Server configuration form->Advanced tab and update the translation table from our website with a single click.

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FLEXlm FLEXnet 2012 feature codes for Autodesk products

Feature Code => Product Name translation table can be found in Autodesk site: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/dl/item?siteID=123112&id=17288427&linkID=9242258

OpenLM updates this information regularly. If update is needed open the OpenLM Server configuration form->Advanced tab and update the translation table from our website with a single click.

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